Category: Uncategorized

May 17

CORE10 Architecture Launches New YouTube Series about Significance of St. Louis Awe-Inspiring Buildings and Landmarks with Drone Videos

St. Louis (May 2, 2017)CORE10 Architecture, a St. Louis-based architectural firm, recently launched a new YouTube channel to celebrate the kickoff of its 10th anniversary in May.

Each month, a new video narrated by Michael Byrd, AIA, CSI, and Tyler Stephens, AIA, CORE10 Architecture Principals and co-founders, will be released featuring a building or landmark throughout St. Louis that has significant design elements and architectural features. A drone is used to film so the viewer can experience the full view of each structure that is highlighted in each video.

The purpose of the newly launched YouTube channel is to celebrate and educate viewers about the historical significance St. Louis has in architecture and design, highlight CORE10’s significant past projects, and kickoff CORE10 Architecture’s 10th anniversary, which is May 10, 2007. The theme for the milestone anniversary is “10 for 10” – 10 years in business on its founding of May 10th.

The first video features the Lindell Terrace Building located at 4501 Lindell Blvd., in the heart of the Central West End. In the video, Stephens guides the viewer through the history of the building and discusses how the building is a landmark for the area.

“The downtown city landscape of St. Louis is full of many incredible buildings, designs and structures,” said Michael Byrd, AIA, CORE10 Architecture Principal and co-founder. “When Tyler and I discussed a way to kick-off the 10th anniversary, we thought that this would be a creative, unique and educational way to share information and showcase the uniqueness of the St. Louis urban landscape.”

The second video, which was released April 28, features the CORE10 project, the Loop Trolley headquarters for the new trolley system that will link University City and Forest Park.

Stephens added, “As architects, we get our inspiration spending time on the streets in the city we love. It gives us context and the visualization to design something that is inspirational, functional and complimentary to the surrounding structures.”

Celebrating its 10th anniversary in 2017, CORE10 Architecture is an architectural firm based in the historic Central West End of St. Louis. The team of architects work on a variety of projects nationwide ranging from institutional and mixed-use commercial to multifamily and single family custom residential projects. The goal for each CORE10 Architecture client is the same – to make each design unique and to make the outcome inspirational. To learn more, please visit www.core10arch.com.

Mar 15

New Development Plan In The Hill Neighborhood Moves Forward

 

 

This article was contributed by Rio Vitale of Ciaostl.com

It’s official.  The development plan in the Hill neighborhood is moving forward. The plan is to build apartments, town homes, condos and single-family homes to replace a vacant 11-acre factory complex in the neighborhood. This property on the Hill is bordered on the east between Daggett and Bischoff on Hereford Street, directly behind St. Ambrose Church and South Kingshighway on the west.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American Stove Company, Coin Accepters, and other manufacturers occupied the 11-acre site.  These companies once employed many neighborhood residents. The property has been vacant for almost 20 years.

The Sansone Group submitted final plans for this development, which includes a 225-unit apartment complex, 49 town homes, approximately 45 condominiums and 20 single-family homes at 4932 Daggett Avenue. The developer and the neighborhood are hopeful the project will bring younger residents to the Hill and the surrounding area.  As developers have explained, this neighborhood is desirable because of the services available, restaurants, coffee shops, and salons all within walking distance and convenient to major attractions allowing an easy commute.  The main concerns of many residents are the traffic and parking conditions. The proposed structure has its own parking garage, which is not visible from the front of the building.  The Sansone Group has priced these units to attract millennials that enjoy city living, but also the modern conveniences that renting a typical shotgun home in the neighborhood does not provide.  It appears likely for the upwardly mobile residents that they will eventually move into a home in or around the surrounding neighborhoods.

This has been the biggest and the most contested project on the ‘Hill’ since Highway 44 separated the most northern streets from the rest of the neighborhood in the 1972.    Today Highway 44 separates Northrup and Pattison from the southern part of the Hill.  One hundred homes were demolished on the south side of Pattison in order to build Interstate 44. The original plan for this section of I-44 was opposed valiantly by Hill 2000 (the neighborhood organization) lead by Fr. Sal Polizzi. The group was not successful in getting the highway rerouted.  These dedicated citizens were successful in getting approval for an additional overpass on the highway when a committee from the Hill presented the United States Department of Transportation a check for $50,000. The bridge would keep the neighborhood connected so people could continue to walk to work and worship at St. Ambrose Church.

I have spoken and worked with a number of developers for this particular property over the past five years and each one had decided against development projects because of the neighborhood residents’ resistance to any plans that did not include residential homes and other restrictions placed upon the property, which would limited profitability.

This new $40 million development needed some bridges built as well. It required bridging the gap of what the old residents and political environmental wanted to preserve and what the newer younger residents wanted, growth and a potential for progress.  Largely the Sansone Group and the new Board of Directors of the Hill 2000 Neighborhood Organization built the bridge, which brought the two sides together. Thereby, the current development plan was approved.

There were a number of neighborhood meetings help between residents, St. Louis City Alderman Joe Vollmer and the Hill 2000 Neighborhood Association that were heated and exhausting.  There were surveys conducted that were contested, petitions signed trying to stop the project, and other obstacles. The Sansone Group believed in their project was determined not going to give up on the neighborhood.  They had meetings with Alderman Joe Vollmer and Monsignor Vince Bommarito (Pastor of St. Ambrose Church) and came up with a plan that could be acceptable to both community leaders. While many older residents were not in favor of the Sansone plan, it seemed the majority of the residents welcomed the new development.  Alderman Vollmer was then able to proceed with a presentation to the Board of Alderman for final approval of the project.

As more residents move into the neighborhood, there will be a need for businesses to  open on Sundays in the neighborhood.  It is expected that the Hill businesses will want to share in this new growth potential and expand their hours.  This type of activity is very much welcomed around the neighborhood, as traditionally Sunday is a break away from the traffic and tourist that appear daily.  

The Hill is currently undergoing a number of growing pains, which often come with progress.  There have been a number of new homes built, restored or rehabbed. This means large dumpsters on the street, mud flowing into the street due to grading or the demolition of an older home.  While it is understood there will be difficulties and inconveniences during construction, these are the challenges that accompany progress and change.  There is no crystal ball to tell us what is going to happen in five or ten years, but this deal looks to be profitable for all involved.